Dallas City Council’s vote against fracking was a vote against your quality of life

Re: “‘No’ vote on fracking is a yes for quality of life,” Saturday Hits and Misses.

You asserted the city council’s “no” vote on hydraulic fracturing was a “yes for quality of life.” I’m curious: Were those words typed on a computer free of petrochemicals? Did the authors get to work without the use of oil products? Was the air conditioner running at the office?

Re: “‘No’ vote on fracking is a yes for quality of life,” Saturday Hits and Misses.

You asserted the city council’s “no” vote on hydraulic fracturing was a “yes for quality of life.” I’m curious: Were those words typed on a computer free of petrochemicals? Did the authors get to work without the use of oil products? Was the air conditioner running at the office?

Hydraulic fracturing has improved our quality of life: lower energy bills, new jobs in a sluggish economy, and more tax revenue. Air pollution is down thanks to increased natural gas use. Ironically, in the same editorial, this paper complained about the health risks of air pollution from power plants in the Dallas area – the same pollution natural gas use has prevented elsewhere.

Yes, there are risks in shale development. But can those risks be managed in a major metropolitan area? There are more than 1,600 producing wells in Fort Worth, and more than 18,000 wells throughout the Barnett Shale. The environmental apocalypse we hear from opponents has never materialized, although over 100,000 Texas jobs have.

Dallas didn’t vote to increase anyone’s quality of life. It voted to stick its head in the sand, pretending that electricity comes from the light switch and that our economy is powered with ideology.

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